Monthly Archives: November 2008

The Ishango Bone.

The Math Factor Podcast discusses the finding of the Ishango Bone and methods of African counting. The Ishango Bone is an ancient African bone containing tally marks possibly used as a teaching tool. I prefer my white board.

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Poster Power.

This just happened, I didn’t plan to do this. But, lately I’ve been culminating all my units with a group made poster that illustrates the groups understanding of some problem. It’s all about students communicating mathematics. This time I asked them to invent their own problem.

student-poster

Graphing Inequalities.

Kate at f(t) shares a great idea for teaching inequalities.

Beauty and Truth

Original Article from Science Daily

“Participants were more likely to judge symmetric additions than asymmetric additions to be correct. As this was also the case when additions in fact were incorrect, the finding cannot be explained by the fact that symmetric additions were easier to count or to estimate: In this case, symmetric additions that were incorrect would have been less likely to be judged correct. The results clearly show that participants used symmetry as an indication to correctness, or beauty as truth.”

Latest School Epedemic: Word Walls

I think mostly in response to suggestions of state officials which translates too administrator edicts, word walls are becoming prevalent throughout the my high school. I’ve had a student created wall in the past where students made word posters with the word, definition and a picture, but I never did this activity frequently enough to have a comprehensive list of the important course vocabulary. This year I’ve tried something different: the idea is to have a “word of the day,” the wall then serves as a record of those important words that students are expected to know. “Word of the day” communication started out pretty strong but lately I haven’t been printing the words out in time. I just got caught up with it. Doesn’t it look awesome!?